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Giro Terraduro Clipless Mountain Bike Shoe ReviewBest Clipless Mountain Bike Shoe Review

Best Bang for Your Buck All-Mountain and Enduro Clipless Mountain Bike Shoe

  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 100% 100%
  • Traction and “Hike-a-Bike-Ability” 40% 40%
  • Comfort and Fit 90% 90%
  • Durability 90% 90%
  • Weight 100% 100%

Best Application: Cross Country Racing

Closure: Dual Boa IP1

Sole: Dynalast Carbon Fiber

Outsole: Dual-density Michelin Rubber

Weight: 390g (size 45)

Upper Material: Teijin Synthetic Leather

What We Like: Dual Boa Closure, Amazing Power Transfer

What We Don’t: Expensive, Lack of Durability, Poor Off Bike Performance

Price: $400.00

The Giro Terraduro is a top of the line all-mountain and all-around slaying clipless mountain bike shoe. Coming in at half of the price of our top all-mountain and enduro pick, the Shimano ME7, the Terraduro definitely brings more than half of the performance.

There is one constant complaint about the Terraduro, and that is that it runs extremely narrow. However, the Giro Terraduro comes in a high volume option, which is really more like a standard fit, while the standard is more of a narrow fit. Giro also offers the Terradura in a women’s specific variant, the Terradura. However, it also suffers from the small, narrow fit of the Terraduro, so we would recommend women size up or try the men’s standard or HV version.

Compare to Similar Products

See Our Best Clipless Mountain Bike Shoe Review!

Shimano ME7

  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 80% 80%
  • Traction and “Hike-a-Bike-Ability” 100% 100%
  • Comfort and Fit 90% 90%
  • Durability 90% 90%
  • Weight 80% 80%

Pros

Comfortable

Versatile

Great Power Transfer

Great Off the Bike Traction

Cons

Not the Cheapest Nor the Lightest Clipless Mountain Bike Shoe

Best Application: Enduro/All-Mountain

Closure: Speed Lace System and Upper Ratchet Strap, Large Velcro Panel Over Laces

Sole: Carbon Fiber Composite

Outsole: Michelin Rubber

Weight: 425g (size 44)

Upper Material: Synthetic

Giro Empire VR90

  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 100% 100%
  • Traction and “Hike-a-Bike-Ability” 60% 60%
  • Comfort and Fit 70% 70%
  • Durability 60% 60%
  • Weight 100% 100%

Pros

Ultra-Lightweight

Amazing Power Transfer

Cons

Too Narrow for Many

Questionable Durability

Best Applicaton: XC

Closure: Laces

Sole: Easton EC90 Carbon Fiber

Outsole: Vibram Mont Molded Rubber High Traction Lugged Outsole

Weight: 338g (size 43.5)

Upper Material: Microfiber

Shimano S-Phyre XC9

  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 100% 100%
  • Traction and “Hike-a-Bike-Ability” 40% 40%
  • Comfort and Fit 90% 90%
  • Durability 90% 90%
  • Weight 100% 100%

Pros

Dual Boa Closure

Amazing Power Transfer

Cons

Expensive

Lack of Durability

Poor Off Bike Performance

Best Application: Cross Country Racing

Closure: Dual Boa IP1

Sole: Dynalast Carbon Fiber

Outsole: Dual-density Michelin Rubber

Weight: 390g (size 45)

Upper Material: Teijin Synthetic Leather

Giro Terraduro

  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 70% 70%
  • Traction and “Hike-a-Bike-Ability” 100% 100%
  • Comfort and Fit 70% 70%
  • Durability 90% 90%
  • Weight 60% 60%

Pros

Well Rounded

Great On and Off the Bike

Great Value

Cons

Fairly Heavy

Best Application: Enduro/All-Mountain

Closure: Replaceable N1 Ratcheting Buckle Closure at Ankle, Two D-ring Velcro Straps at Midfoot

Sole: Nylon

Outsole: Vibram High-Traction Lugged Outsole

Weight: 458g (size 43.5)

Upper Material: Microfiber

Giro Privateer R

  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 70% 70%
  • Traction and “Hike-a-Bike-Ability” 80% 80%
  • Comfort and Fit 70% 70%
  • Durability 70% 70%
  • Weight 90% 90%

Pros

Durable for XC Shoes

Lightweight

Good Power Transfer

Great Value

Cons

Narrow Fit

Less Durable Than Terraduros

Best Application: XC, Trail

Closure: Replaceable N1 Ratcheting Buckle Closure at Ankle, Two D-ring Velcro Straps at Midfoot

Sole: Nylon

Outsole: Co-molded Nylon and High Traction Rubber

Weight: 386g (size 43.5)

Upper Material: Microfiber

Giro Chamber 2

  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 70% 70%
  • Traction and “Hike-a-Bike-Ability” 80% 80%
  • Comfort and Fit 80% 80%
  • Durability 100% 100%
  • Weight 50% 50%

Pros

Well Protected

Durable

Wide Range of Cleat Adjustment

Cons

Heavy

Narrow for Riders with Wide Feet

Best Application: Enduro, Downhill, All-mountain

Closure: Laces Plus Power Strap

Sole: Tri-molded SPD Compatible

Outsole: Vibram Megagrip

Weight: 525g (size 44)

Upper Material: Water Resistant Microfiber

Shimano XC7

  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 90% 90%
  • Traction and “Hike-a-Bike-Ability” 70% 70%
  • Comfort and Fit 80% 80%
  • Durability 70% 70%
  • Weight 100% 100%

Pros

Top of the Line XC Performance at Half the Price

Cons

Still a Pricy Shoe for Marginal Gains Over the Giro Privateer R

Best Application: XC

Closure: Boa IP1

Sole: Carbon-Reinforced Nylon

Outsole: Dual-Density Michelin Rubber

Weight: 365g (size 45)

Upper Material: Perforated Upper

Five Ten Kestral Lace

  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 70% 70%
  • Traction and “Hike-a-Bike-Ability” 90% 90%
  • Comfort and Fit 60% 60%
  • Durability 100% 100%
  • Weight 60% 60%

Pros

Patented Five Ten Grip and Durability

Cons

Heavy

Comfort Issues

Best Application: Enduro/All-Mountain  

Closure: Lace-Up with Hook and Loop Ankle Strap

Sole: Nylon

Outsole: C4 Stealth

Weight: 484g (size 43)

Upper Material: Polyurethane-coated synthetic

Pearl Izumi X-Project P.R.O.

  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 90% 90%
  • Traction and “Hike-a-Bike-Ability” 90% 90%
  • Comfort and Fit 80% 80%
  • Durability 40% 40%
  • Weight 80% 80%

Pros

Great Pedaling Efficiency

Comfortable and Grippy off the Bike

Cons

Expensive

Least Durable Shoe in Review

Best Application: XC, All-Mountain

Closure: Two BOA IP1 dials

Sole: Carbon Composite

Outsole: Molded Carbon Rubber Tips on TPU Lugs

Weight: 419g (size 44)

Upper Material: Advanced 3-Layer Seamless Composite

Rigidity and Power Transfer

The Giro Terraduro utilizes a stiff, nylon shank in the sole that creates extremely solid power transfer while pedaling. On the bike, it is comparable to the Shimano ME7, though not as stiff as top cross country offerings like the Giro Empire VR90.

Like other top all-mountain shoes, the Giro Terraduro is stiff enough to work with platformless pedals, yet is beefy enough and offers just enough flex in the right places to allow it to interface with both medium and large platformed clipless pedals, like the Crank Brothers Candy 7 or Mallet E.

Traction and “Hike-a-Bike-Ability”

While the Giro Terraduro feels plenty stiff on the bike, it uses the same flex point in the extreme tow of the shoe as the Giro Empire VR90 to make for a fairly pleasant experience walking when off of the bike.

The Terraduro’s sole is made of Vibram rubber. If you have read our review of the top flat mountain bike shoes, you know that we were not a fan of the way Vibram rubber gripped pedals, but we were huge fans of the way it gripped the ground. This makes it a great rubber for use on clipless shoes, and the large lugs of the Terraduro’s Vibram soles offer some of the best hike-a-bike traction of any clipless mountain bike shoe in our review. However, those lugs are tightly spaced and have a tendency to cake with mud much worse than those on the Shimano GR7.

Comfort and Fit

As our disclaimer at the beginning of this article pointed out, the one constant negative about the Giro Terraduro is that it fits on the extremely narrow side of narrow. We would recommend everyone either size up or opt for the Giro Terraduro HV, which is really more of a standard fit shoe than a high volume fit. Likewise, for women with all but the smallest most narrow feet, our option would be to steer clear of the women’s specific Giro Terradura and opt for either the standard or HV version of the men’s Terraduro.

Assuming that you have figured out the sizing, the Giro Terraduro is a comfortable shoe. Giro’s microfiber upper is supple yet secure, and an abrasion resistant rubberized coating runs around the entirety of the shoe, providing protection against cuts to the shoe as well as impacts to your feet.

Finally, the combination of two D-ring mounted velcro straps on the toe and midfoot and a ratchet strap below the ankle allows for a highly adjustable fit, though one more prone to creating hotspots than a lace-up shoe.

Finally, the Giro Terraduro is more covered in rubber and straps than some shoes on our list, which means it has significantly less room for airflow and ventilation. This makes it warmer and less breathable shoe than most of our other top picks.

Durability

The Giro Terraduro is an exceptionally durable shoe, and it is one that has been around long enough for that point to have been tested over the course of many seasons. The Vibram sole is as durable as you would expect a Vibram sole to be and thick enough that even after some wear there is plenty of it left to do the job. Also, unlike more XC oriented, shoes, there are no exposed areas on the outsole that threaten to shorten the Terraduro’s life expectancy.

Meanwhile, the microfiber of the uppers is tough to begin with, but also heavily reinforced at the heel, toe box, and anywhere that straps might put pressure on it while tightening. The ratchet strap is fairly out of the way and is replaceable, just in case you do manage to snag it on something and damage it.

The Giro Terraduro is a shoe that is in it for the long haul. It should stand up to the most demanding riders, and hold up through countless hike-a-bikes and dismounts, as well as to traction pin using pedals like the Shimano Saint M820 or Crank Brothers Mallet E.

Weight

Weighing in at 458g for a size 43.5, the Giro Terraduro is neither exceptionally light nor exceptionally heavy. It is about the weight that we expect a fairly beefy, extremely durable all-mountain clipless shoe to be. However, it is lighter than we would expect a beefy, durable, all-mountain shoe at its price point to be.

The Bottom Line

With an MSRP of only $109, the Giro Terraduro is an extremely hard clipless mountain bike shoe to beat. Sure, it will not be the shoe for the hardcore XC racing crowd, but it is not meant to be. It is an extremely durable shoe that really can do it all, and do it all extremely well at a price that does not break the bank.

Of course, all of this is assuming that you get the sizing issue figured out, which can be a pain. However, just plan to order up a size, or order the Terraduro HV, and you should be good to go.

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