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Five Ten Freerider Flat Mountain Bike Shoe ReviewBest Flat Mountain Bike Shoe Review

Best Value Flat Mountain Bike Shoe

  • Grip 90% 90%
  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 50% 50%
  • Protection 50% 50%
  • Comfort 80% 80%
  • Breathability 70% 70%
  • Durability 70% 70%
  • Wet Weather Performance 80% 80%

Rubber Type: Stealth S1

Rubber Pattern: Full Dot

Weight: 418.15g

Upper Material: Suede/Mesh

Price: $99.95

What We Like: Amazing grip without making it difficult to readjust foot position

What We Don’t: Not as durable as Freerider Pro, and sole lacks rigidity for maximum power transfer

The Five Ten Freerider is the cheapest flat mountain bike shoe in the Freerider lineup, but don’t let this fool you into thinking that it is a low-quality shoe. Featuring the same Stealth Rubber and full dot tread pattern found on the Freerider Pro, some of the things that make the base Freerider cheaper might also make it a better mountain bike shoe for your needs.

The Five Ten Freerider is also available in a water-resistant variant called the Five Ten Freerider Element. This is the exact same shoe as the basic Freerider, but without the mesh panels and with a DWR coating to repel water.

Compare to Similar Products

See Our Best Flat Mountain Bike Shoe Review!

Shimano GR9

  • Grip 90% 90%
  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 80% 80%
  • Protection 80% 80%
  • Comfort 80% 80%
  • Breathability 70% 70%
  • Durability 100% 100%
  • Wet Weather Performance 100% 100%

Pros

Comfortable

Amazing Grip

Great in Wet Weather

Cons

Difficult to readjust on the pedals

Rubber Type: Michelin

Rubber Pattern: Full Tread

Weight: 365g

Upper Material: Synthetic Leather

Five Ten Freerider Pro

  • Grip 90% 90%
  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 90% 90%
  • Protection 80% 80%
  • Comfort 70% 70%
  • Breathability 50% 50%
  • Durability 90% 90%
  • Wet Weather Performance 90% 90%

Pros

Amazing grip without making it difficult to readjust foot position

Cons

Sole is too stiff for some riders

Rubber Type: Stealth S1

Rubber Pattern: Full Dot

Weight: 396.89g

Upper Material: Synthetic Leather

Shimano GR7

  • Grip 90% 90%
  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 80% 80%
  • Protection 80% 80%
  • Comfort 80% 80%
  • Breathability 90% 90%
  • Durability 100% 100%
  • Wet Weather Performance 90% 90%

Pros

Comfortable

Amazing Grip

Great in Wet Weather

Very Breathable

Cons

Difficult to readjust on the pedals

Rubber Type: Michelin

Rubber Pattern: Full Tread

Weight: 396.9g

Upper Material: Perforated Synthetic with Mesh

Five Ten Freerider Contact

  • Grip 100% 100%
  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 80% 80%
  • Protection 70% 70%
  • Comfort 80% 80%
  • Breathability 70% 70%
  • Durability 30% 30%
  • Wet Weather Performance 50% 50%

Pros

Unbeatable Grip

Easy to adjust feat

Comfortable

Cons

Worst in review durability

Rubber Type: Stealth Mi6

Rubber Pattern: Half Dot

Weight: 389.8g

Upper Material: Textile/Synthetic Leather

Five Ten Freerider

  • Grip 90% 90%
  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 50% 50%
  • Protection 50% 50%
  • Comfort 80% 80%
  • Breathability 70% 70%
  • Durability 70% 70%
  • Wet Weather Performance 80% 80%

Pros

Amazing grip without making it difficult to readjust foot position

Cons

Not as durable as Freerider Pro

Sole lacks rigidity for maximum power transfer

Rubber Type: Stealth S1

Rubber Pattern: Full Dot

Weight: 418.15g

Upper Material: Suede/Mesh

Afton Keegan

  • Grip 70% 70%
  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 60% 60%
  • Protection 70% 70%
  • Comfort 90% 90%
  • Breathability 50% 50%
  • Durability 90% 90%
  • Wet Weather Performance 80% 80%

Pros

Mono-directional shank makes for unbeatable rigidity on the bike and comfort off of it

Cons

Less grippy than top picks

Rubber Type: Intact Rubber

Rubber Pattern: Skate Style

Weight: 396.89g

Upper Material: Synthetic Leather

Five Ten Impact Pro

  • Grip 90% 90%
  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 100% 100%
  • Protection 90% 90%
  • Comfort 60% 60%
  • Breathability 30% 30%
  • Durability 90% 90%
  • Wet Weather Performance 90% 90%

Pros

Unbeatable power transfer and foot protection

Great grip on and off the bike

Cons

Sole is too stiff for some riders

Rubber Type: Stealth S1

Rubber Pattern: Multi Dot

Weight: 550g

Upper Material: Synthetic

Pearl Izumi X-Alp Launch

  • Grip 40% 40%
  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 90% 90%
  • Protection 80% 80%
  • Comfort 70% 70%
  • Breathability 70% 70%
  • Durability 100% 100%
  • Wet Weather Performance 30% 30%

Pros

Durable, Stiff

Great Foot Protection

Cons

Vibram rubber lacks grip

Rubber Type: Vibram Megagrip

Rubber Pattern: Full Dot

Weight: 406g

Upper Material: Bonded, Seamless

Giro Riddance

  • Grip 50% 50%
  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 90% 90%
  • Protection 80% 80%
  • Comfort 60% 60%
  • Breathability 80% 80%
  • Durability 80% 80%
  • Wet Weather Performance 30% 30%

Pros

Durable and Breathable

Cons

Vibram sole lacks grip

Rubber Type: Megagrip ISR

Rubber Pattern: Full Dot

Weight: 430g

Upper Material: Microfiber

Grip

The Five Ten Freerider features the same Stealth rubber compound and Full Dot tread pattern that helped make the Freerider Pro one of our top all-around picks for the best flat mountain bike shoe on the market. This is the same rubber compound and tread pattern found on all Freeriders outside of the Freerider Contact, and it is probably the most widely ridden outsole in the world! Its grip is unmatched by any but the Five Ten Mi6 rubber compound, and unlike the Mi6, it does not have any durability issues.

The level of grip and confidence that the stealth rubber compound instills is tough to beat. The full dot tread pattern of the Five Ten Freerider further adds to its grip. The pins of your pedals dig in between the dots giving you a more secure feeling on the pedals. The full dot tread pattern does not lock in your feet quite the way that Shimano’s Michelin soled shoes do, but it offers a compromise between being fully locked in and being able to more easily adjust your foot on the pedal.

Like the Five Ten Freerider Pro, the Freerider’s full dot tread pattern offers solid traction in hike a bike situations as well.

Rigidity and Protection

The Five Ten Freerider is one of the least rigid shoes in our review. If your usual rides include big mileage in even bigger terrain, then this will leave you more fatigued and likely looking for a stiffer shoe, such as the Freerider Pro or Shimano GR9. However, if you favor shorter rides, or want a shoe for popping around on the local jump track and hitting the local scene afterward, then the more flexible sole of the Five Ten Freerider might be perfect. It allows you to wrap your feet around the pedal, adding to the great grip of its sole, and it is also more comfortable for wearing out and about as well as on shorter, less demanding rides.

The basic Freerider also lacks the extra cushioning and toe box protection found in the Freerider Pro. However, along with its softer sole, this results in increased feedback from the pedals, which many riders prefer to the muted feel of the Five Ten Freerider Pro and Five Ten Impact Pro.

Comfort and Breathability

While the softer sole might hinder power output and increase fatigue on longer rides, it makes for a very comfortable shoe on shorter rides and spins around the neighborhood. It also makes for an infinitely more comfortable shoe to wear around town or in extended hike a bike scenarios.

The mesh upper and lack of extra padding also make the Five Ten Freerider a more breathable shoe than the Freerider Pro. Of course, this means it is also more susceptible to allowing water into the shoe.

Durability

One of the most popular flat mountain bike shoes in the world, the Five Ten Freerider’s reputation for durability speaks for itself, and the shoe lives up to the reputation. The grippy Stealth sole is incredibly durable, as is the leather upper.

Additional Features

There is not too much to feature here. The Five ten Freerider doesn’t boast any ankle sleeves or shoelace protectors. It is just a solid all around shoe at a bargain price.

The Bottom Line

It is easy to dismiss the Five Ten Freerider as nothing but a cheaper version of the Freerider Pro. While it is that, it is also so much more. Its “weaknesses,” such as its more flexible sole and lack of padding, are also what makes it better ventilated, more comfortable to walk around in, and makes it provide better feedback on the bike. Many people would choose the Five Ten Freerider over the Freerider Pro, even if they were the same price.

Finally, the Five Ten Freerider has an MSRP of $100. This puts them on the cheaper end of the shoes in our review, and an excellent value buy, so long as you purchase them for their intended realm of use.

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