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Shimano GR7 Flat Mountain Bike Shoe ReviewBest Flat Mountain Bike Shoe Review

Best All-Around Flat Mountain Bike Shoe for Warm Weather

  • Grip 90% 90%
  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 80% 80%
  • Protection 80% 80%
  • Comfort 80% 80%
  • Breathability 90% 90%
  • Durability 100% 100%
  • Wet Weather Performance 90% 90%

Rubber Type: Michelin

Rubber Pattern: Full Tread

Weight: 396.9g

Upper Material: Perforated Synthetic with Mesh

Price: $97.50 – $130.00

What We Like: Comfortable, amazing grip, great in wet weather, very breathable

What We Don’t: Difficult to readjust on the pedals

The Shimano GR7 flat mountain bike shoe is extremely similar to our top pick, the Shimano GR9. It is a bit more breathable, but with only a $20 difference in MSRP, we recommend picking up the GR9 for cooler, wetter riding and the GR7 for warmer, drier riding.

Compare to Similar Products

See Our Best Flat Mountain Bike Shoe Review!

Shimano GR9

  • Grip 90% 90%
  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 80% 80%
  • Protection 80% 80%
  • Comfort 80% 80%
  • Breathability 70% 70%
  • Durability 100% 100%
  • Wet Weather Performance 100% 100%

Pros

Comfortable

Amazing Grip

Great in Wet Weather

Cons

Difficult to readjust on the pedals

Rubber Type: Michelin

Rubber Pattern: Full Tread

Weight: 365g

Upper Material: Synthetic Leather

Five Ten Freerider Pro

  • Grip 90% 90%
  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 90% 90%
  • Protection 80% 80%
  • Comfort 70% 70%
  • Breathability 50% 50%
  • Durability 90% 90%
  • Wet Weather Performance 90% 90%

Pros

Amazing grip without making it difficult to readjust foot position

Cons

Sole is too stiff for some riders

Rubber Type: Stealth S1

Rubber Pattern: Full Dot

Weight: 396.89g

Upper Material: Synthetic Leather

Shimano GR7

  • Grip 90% 90%
  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 80% 80%
  • Protection 80% 80%
  • Comfort 80% 80%
  • Breathability 90% 90%
  • Durability 100% 100%
  • Wet Weather Performance 90% 90%

Pros

Comfortable

Amazing Grip

Great in Wet Weather

Very Breathable

Cons

Difficult to readjust on the pedals

Rubber Type: Michelin

Rubber Pattern: Full Tread

Weight: 396.9g

Upper Material: Perforated Synthetic with Mesh

Five Ten Freerider Contact

  • Grip 100% 100%
  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 80% 80%
  • Protection 70% 70%
  • Comfort 80% 80%
  • Breathability 70% 70%
  • Durability 30% 30%
  • Wet Weather Performance 50% 50%

Pros

Unbeatable Grip

Easy to adjust feat

Comfortable

Cons

Worst in review durability

Rubber Type: Stealth Mi6

Rubber Pattern: Half Dot

Weight: 389.8g

Upper Material: Textile/Synthetic Leather

Five Ten Freerider

  • Grip 90% 90%
  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 50% 50%
  • Protection 50% 50%
  • Comfort 80% 80%
  • Breathability 70% 70%
  • Durability 70% 70%
  • Wet Weather Performance 80% 80%

Pros

Amazing grip without making it difficult to readjust foot position

Cons

Not as durable as Freerider Pro

Sole lacks rigidity for maximum power transfer

Rubber Type: Stealth S1

Rubber Pattern: Full Dot

Weight: 418.15g

Upper Material: Suede/Mesh

Afton Keegan

  • Grip 70% 70%
  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 60% 60%
  • Protection 70% 70%
  • Comfort 90% 90%
  • Breathability 50% 50%
  • Durability 90% 90%
  • Wet Weather Performance 80% 80%

Pros

Mono-directional shank makes for unbeatable rigidity on the bike and comfort off of it

Cons

Less grippy than top picks

Rubber Type: Intact Rubber

Rubber Pattern: Skate Style

Weight: 396.89g

Upper Material: Synthetic Leather

Five Ten Impact Pro

  • Grip 90% 90%
  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 100% 100%
  • Protection 90% 90%
  • Comfort 60% 60%
  • Breathability 30% 30%
  • Durability 90% 90%
  • Wet Weather Performance 90% 90%

Pros

Unbeatable power transfer and foot protection

Great grip on and off the bike

Cons

Sole is too stiff for some riders

Rubber Type: Stealth S1

Rubber Pattern: Multi Dot

Weight: 550g

Upper Material: Synthetic

Pearl Izumi X-Alp Launch

  • Grip 40% 40%
  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 90% 90%
  • Protection 80% 80%
  • Comfort 70% 70%
  • Breathability 70% 70%
  • Durability 100% 100%
  • Wet Weather Performance 30% 30%

Pros

Durable, Stiff

Great Foot Protection

Cons

Vibram rubber lacks grip

Rubber Type: Vibram Megagrip

Rubber Pattern: Full Dot

Weight: 406g

Upper Material: Bonded, Seamless

Giro Riddance

  • Grip 50% 50%
  • Rigidity and Power Transfer 90% 90%
  • Protection 80% 80%
  • Comfort 60% 60%
  • Breathability 80% 80%
  • Durability 80% 80%
  • Wet Weather Performance 30% 30%

Pros

Durable and Breathable

Cons

Vibram sole lacks grip

Rubber Type: Megagrip ISR

Rubber Pattern: Full Dot

Weight: 430g

Upper Material: Microfiber

Grip

The Sole of the Shimano GR7 is the exact same Michelin made sole found on the Shimano GR9. While they are new to the mountain bike shoe market, Michelin has hit the ground running with one of the best flat mountain bike shoe soles that we have ever seen.

The rubber itself is not quite as grippy as the Mi6 rubber of the Five Ten Freerider Contact, but it is infinitely more durable, and the truck tire-like tread pattern locks onto traction pins and holds on for dear life. Like the sole of the GR9, this tread pattern coupled with the grippy Michelin rubber results in a locked in feel, unlike any other flat mountain bike shoe.

Of course, this means that once your feet are locked in, you actually have to pick them up to reposition them. While some might prefer the easier to adjust your footing nature of the Five Ten full dot, tread pattern, clipless converts and riders who want maximum confidence will love the feel of the Shimano GR7’s Michelin sole.

Just as with the Shimano GR9, the lug like tread pattern of the GR7 maintains grip very well in wet conditions, as well as in hike a bike situations, and these are areas where Shimano’s Michelin soles are significantly better than the competition.

Rigidity and Protection

Like the GR9, the Shimano GR7 is an all-mountain shoe. It has the same stiff sole that provides great power transfer and will keep your legs feeling fresh on those long hard days in the big mountains. The sole is a bit softer than the Five Ten Impact or Freerider Pro, and unlike those shoes, the Shimano GR7 does not dull the feedback of the trail. It also allows your shoe to contour more easily to the shape of your pedals, which is great when you are really trying to grip the pedals for bunny hops or jumps.

The Shimano GR7 also features the same stiff toe box and heel area, as well as the amply padded ankle found on the GR9. Combined with the stiff Michelin Sole, all of this makes for a pretty armored shoe that will protect your foot during those high-speed enduro dismounts.

Comfort and Breathability

The Shimano GR7 fits just like the GR9, and is just as comfortable. Its sole strikes the perfect balance between being soft enough to walk comfortably off of the bike, while remaining stiff enough not to fatigue your feet on long rides.

It also continues the trend of Shimano’s new, wider toe boxes, making the GR7 a great choice for riders with wider feet.

Finally, the ample mesh on the upper and the lack of the GR9’s lace cover make the GR7 an excellently ventilated flat mountain bike shoe, the best in our review in fact. Of course, the exposed tongue and lace area will allow more water to get in on wet days, but it would be our pick for riding in hot and dry climates.

Durability

Featuring the exact same Michelin sole found on the GR9, the GR7 is extremely durable. We would say that the sole is much more durable than the Five Ten Mi6 Sole of the Freerider Contact and slightly more durable than the Stealth soles of other Freeriders.

Finally, like the upper of the GR9, the GR7’s synthetic leather upper half is quite tough, although the exposed laces are less protected than the speed laces of the GR9.

Additional Features

Gone are the speed laces and tongue cover found on the GR9. Instead, the Shimano GR7 uses standard laces, which are tried and true if a bit less fancy, with an elastic strap behind which they can be safely stored and kept far from your chainring while riding.

In place of the raised ankle collar of the GR9, the GR7 features a gaiter like sleeve to keep out debris. While it is a bit less effective at its primary task than the raised ankle of the GR9, it makes it blend in much better at the local pub after a ride.

The Bottom Line

Like the GR9, the Shimano GR7 is an excellent all-around flat mountain bike shoe, and one of the very best on the market. If money were no object, then we would have a pair of GR9s for wetter rides and the GR7s for hot and dry rides.

With only a $20 price difference, the GR9’s speed lace system might be worth the extra money. But currently, the Shimano GR7 is on sale for only $100, making it as cheap as our budget picks!

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